2015 New York African Film Festival Tickets

The 22nd New York African Film Festival’s main venues are Film Society of Lincoln Center, Maysles Cinema Institute, and BAMcinématek. The following information will direct you to the relevant sales portal for every venue and its address. We look forward to welcoming you to this year’s festival!

For more information on the films scheduled at the 2015 New York African Film Festival, check out our program guide by clicking here.

LIVE PERFORMANCE AND PANEL DISCUSSION – ACTIVISM AND ART: PERSONAL JOURNEYS IN THE DIASPORA

Friday, May 1st @ 7:00 pm

The Jerome L. Greene Performance Space
44 Charlton Street
New York, NY 10013

The 22nd New York African Film Festival opens with a special preview program honoring the International Decade of People of African Descent. Join us as we celebrate an exchange between the crème de la crème of interdisciplinary artists from the Diaspora who are lending their voices and insights to the evening. Guests include the socially-conscious wordsmith Blitz the Ambassador, the illustrious duo Les Nubians, who are celebrating their 20th anniversary, Andrew Dosunmu, representing an exciting generation of diasporan and transnational filmmakers, and Nana Brew-Hammond, author of the innovative novel Powder Necklace. This event is moderated by international journalist Femi Oke. To get your free tickets, click here!

OPENING NIGHT AND CENTERPIECE FILM RECEPTIONS:

NYAFF Tickets for the Opening Night Reception and Film on May 6th are $75.00 each. You can buy your Opening Night Reception and Screening tickets by clicking here. The film will begin at 7:00pm and the reception will follow at 8:30pm.

NYAFF Tickets for the Centerpiece Night Reception and Film on May 8th are $75.00 each. You can buy your Centerpiece Night Reception and Screening tickets by clicking here. The film will be begin at 6:45pm and the reception will follow at 9:00pm.

*For information on purchasing tickets to the films only, see below.*

FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER:

General Admission $14, Students & Seniors (62+) $11, FSLC members $9.

Tickets are available to purchase through Film Society of Lincoln Center. Click here!

In Person: Film Society box offices.

Discount packages start at $30 for the General Public; $24 for students and seniors (62+); 3+ films packages start at $21 for Film Society members.

Address(es): Walter Reade Theater, 165 West 65th St., and the Elinor Bunin

Munroe Film Center, 144 West 65th St.,  between Broadway and Amsterdam Ave., upper level. 

MAYSLES CINEMA:

Suggested donation: $10. Visit www.maysles.org or call 212 537 6843 for tickets.

Address: 343 Lenox Avenue, between 127th & 128th Streets.

BAMCINÉMATEK:

Tickets: $14 per screening for adults; $10 for seniors 65 and over, children under twelve, and students 25 and under with valid I.D. Monday–Thursday, except holidays; $9 for BAM Cinema Club members.

Tickets are available to purchase through BAM. Click here!

By phone at 718-777-FILM

Address: BAM Rose Cinemas, 30 Lafayette Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11217

For more information please e-mail AFF at nyaff@erols.com or call 212-352-1720 

22nd NY African Film Festival Statement

“International Decade of People of African Descent”

Displacement, emigration, and personal journeys rooted in economic and sociopolitical upheavals have shaped African cinema since its inception. The burgeoning mobility of African men and women across the globe is the inspiration for a myriad of films from a brave new generation of transnational creators. Celebrating the infinite possibilities of digital media and scrupulous reworking of Africa’s long cinematic legacy, their works appeal to an international audience while opening dialogue with other cinema traditions. Their breathtaking movies invite us to embark on a journey where imagination, shared dreams and possibilities direct our gaze to an ever-changing and complex future.

Commemorating the ‘International Decade of People of African Descent,’ we pay tribute to these African men and women and reflect on the ways they have broken through borders with films and narratives that form part of the global imagination in the 21st century. This year, for its 25th anniversary, African Film Festival, Inc. brings audiences the most thrilling and varied annual selection of African films with 50 narrative features and documentaries from 25 countries.

The 22nd edition of the New York African Film Festival places special emphasis on the achievements of the short format and digital technology, which have become a conduit for new stories, sounds and images by freeing their creators from budgetary and technical limitations. One of the jewels of the series, Stories of Our Lives from the Nairobi-based Nest collective, dramatizes LGBTQ life in Kenya in five brief tales, while Women in the Media and Afripedia hone in on the growing creativity of women and urban youth. In Africa, more than half of the population is under 25 years old. Blossoming art centers like Dakar are becoming meccas for fashion designers, hip-hop musicians, graffiti artists, bloggers, and dancers. All get their due in the documentary 100% Dakar – More than Art and The Prophecy by photographer Fabrice Monteiro and designer “Jah Gal”.

Jim Chuchu and the Nest Collectives "Stories of Our Lives."
Jim Chuchu and the Nest Collective’s “Stories of Our Lives”

The mesmerizing thriller Run by Phillippe Lacôte (Ivory Coast), the docudrama National Diploma by Dieudo Hamaadi (DRC), and the comedy of errors Head Gone from one of Nigeria’s finest entertainers –Dare Fasasi- reveal the vitality of popular cinematic genres, while Ethiopian-Israeli Bazi Gete’s autobiographical Red Leaves, based loosely on Shakespeare’s King Lear, is an insightful and poetic look at the internal migration of an aging Ethiopian man living in Israel. To stress the importance of documentaries for revealing truths suppressed by the media, we present Melillenses (Melillans) by Moisés Salama, a broad-minded portrait of the inhabitants of Melilla -a Spanish border-city on Moroccan soil- and Ziara. Over the Threshold by Sonia Gámez, which examines the Marabouts, important sites of religious pilgrimage located in northern Morocco.

22nd NYAFF's Centerpiece Film "Red Leaves" by Bazi Gete
22nd NYAFF’s Centerpiece Film “Red Leaves” by Bazi Gete

Along with such contemporary fare, we will feature the enduring classic Mossane by Senegalese pioneer, Safi Faye. This milestone of African cinema paved the way for the recognition of female voices in the international scene. Their growing prominence is visible in the broad range of women’s works this year spanning north and south. A shining example is The Narrow Frame of Midnight, where Tala Hadid takes us on a voyage through the violence and desolation of Morocco with the interwoven stories of three people.

50 years have passed since Mandela was sent to Robben Island, and post-apartheid South Africa, with one of the strongest film industries on the continent, has become a reference point for artistic creativity. With the fresh and exciting neo-noir Cold Harbour by Carey McKenzie and Love the One You Love, Jenna Bass’s multi-award winning first feature about love and anxieties in the digital era, audiences can catch a glimpse of Cape Town in its multiple facets through the lenses of two of the most promising women filmmakers in the country. Aiming to illuminate the ways official history molds the lives of contemporary South Africans, a pair of documentaries – Sobukwe: A Great Soul and Plot for Peace – rewrite the narrative of apartheid South Africa, helping to show a nuanced past and its effect on the country’s realities. Focusing on the leading figure of Robert Mangaliso Sobukwe, the intentionally forgotten founder of the Pan Africanist Congress, along with controversial French commodities trader Jean-Yves Ollivier, we witness the multitude of factors that make up historical turning points as well as the undeniable power of a single human will.

Opening Night Film "Cold Harbour" by Carey McKenzie
Opening Night Film “Cold Harbour” by Carey McKenzie

A wide-ranging group of the latest and most salient African documentaries, coping with long-lasting misunderstandings about African history and its people, will be showing at the Maysles Cinema, while BAMcinématek will close our festival with AFF’s Travelling Series, a group of carefully selected Brazilian movies, the vibrant South African documentary about art and revolution Shield and Spear, and a screening of the Oscar-nominated film Timbuktu by Abderrahmane Sissako (Mauritania).

Abderrahmane Sissako's Oscar-Nominated "Timbuktu"
Abderrahmane Sissako’s Oscar-Nominated “Timbuktu”

2015 New York African Film Festival Program Guide

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The following program guide lists the features and shorts scheduled to screen at the 2015 New York African Film Festival. This guide begins with information on our Opening Night Reception Exhibition. The line-up is then organized alphabetically, and each film or program of films is followed by its showtime and a trailer (if there is an available trailer). To read the full statement on this year’s festival, click here.

LIVE PERFORMANCE AND PANEL DISCUSSION – ACTIVISM AND ART: PERSONAL JOURNEYS IN THE DIASPORA

Friday, May 1st @ 7:00 pm

The Jerome L. Greene Performance Space
44 Charlton Street
New York, NY 10013

The 22nd New York African Film Festival opens with a special preview program honoring the International Decade of People of African Descent. Join us as we celebrate an exchange between the crème de la crème of interdisciplinary artists from the Diaspora who are lending their voices and insights to the evening. Guests include the socially-conscious wordsmith Blitz the Ambassador, the illustrious duo Les Nubians, who are celebrating their 20th anniversary, Andrew Dosunmu, representing an exciting generation of diasporan and transnational filmmakers, and Nana Brew-Hammond, author of the innovative novel Powder Necklace. This event is moderated by international journalist Femi Oke.

ART SHOW: THE PROPHECY, WEDNESDAY, MAY 6th – TUESDAY, MAY 17th

Amphitheater at The Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center – Free & Open to the Public

FabriceMonteiro2014_prophecy-1_copyright Fabrice Monteiro

This year, the art show at the New York African Film Festival will feature the work of Beninese-Belgian photographer Fabrice Monteiro and will be on display in the Amphitheater at the Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center at Film Society of Lincoln Center from May 6th through May 17th. Based in Dakar, the acclaimed photographer is responsible for some of the most breathtaking and innovative images in recent years. On display will be a digital exhibition of his series “The Prophecy,” environmental-themed photographs that represent the intersection of art, fashion, mythology, and nature.  Working with a collective of other young artists, in “The Prophecy” Monteiro has created searing and imaginative images depicting some of Senegal’s worst-hit areas in order to raise awareness of environmental concerns.

2015 NYAFF FILMS

100% DAKAR – MORE THAN ART (U.S. PREMIERE)
Sandra Krampelhuber, Austria/Senegal, 2014, 62min.
French and Wolof with English subtitles

This documentary offers a vibrant portrait of the youthful and creative arts scene in Dakar, Senegal. The city has long been seen as hub for the arts and 100% Dakar follows many of the creative forces responsible for the current cultural and artistic boom there. Featuring fashion designers, hip-hop musicians, graffiti artists, a photographer, an arts blogger, dancers, and many others, the film reveals a world of people who stand for a passionate, collective, and creative fight against all economic and political burdens in Senegal’s buzzing capital city.

Saturday, May 9th at 4:15pm (Q&A with Sandra Krampelhuber); Tuesday, May 12th at 4pm – Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, Film Society of Lincoln Center


THE ART OF AMA ATA AIDOO
Yaba Badoe, Ghana, 2014, 78min.
English

The Art of Ama Ata Aidoo explores the artistic contribution of one of Africa’s foremost female writers. Director Badoe charts Aidoo’s creative journey over seven decades, from colonial Ghana, through the tumultuous era of independence, to a more sober present day Africa.

Sunday, May 17, 2:00pm – Maysles Cinema


AUGUST WINDS (VENTOS DE AGOSTO)
Gabriel Mascaro, Brazil, 2014, 77min.
Portuguese with English Subtitles

In a small seaside village, Shirley cares for her ailing grandmother while working  on a coconut farm and longing to become a tattoo artist. She passes her time with her boyfriend, Jeison, who works as a diver off the coast of their village. When one of Jeison’s dives turns up a human skull, the duo embarks on a quest to identify the remains while confronting their own ideas about desire, love, life, death, and destiny.

Monday, May 25th, 2:00pm & 6:30pm – BAM Rose Cinemas


BLACK ORPHEUS
Marcel Camus, Brazil, 1958, 106min.
Portuguese with English subtitles

Black Orpheus is the retelling of the Orpheus and Eurydice Greek legend set in Rio de Janeiro during Carnival. Orpheus (Breno Mello), a trolley car conductor, is engaged to Mira (Lourdes de Oliveira) but in love with Eurydice (Marpessa Dawn). A vengeful Mira and Eurydice’s ex-lover, costumed as Death, pursue Orpheus and Eurydice through the intense Carnival night.

Sunday, May 24th, 4:00pm, 6:30pm & 9:00pm – BAM Rose Cinemas


COLD HARBOUR (NY PREMIERE) – Opening Night Film
Carey McKenzie, South Africa, 2014, 73min.
English and Xhosa, Sotho and Mandarin with English subtitles

While investigating a smugglers’ turf war in Cape Town, township cop Sizwe stumbles upon police corruption. His boss and mentor, Venske, gives Sizwe the case but assigns a rookie, Legama, to keep an eye on him. After Sizwe discovers that a homicide is linked to Triad (Chinese mafia) through abalone smuggling, a tip from a former comrade leads to a major bust. Despite the seized contraband being stolen within hours, Sizwe is still promoted to detective. It’s a bitter triumph though—he’s being played, and he knows it. In a world where self-interest and corruption have overtaken loyalty and honor, Sizwe is left with no one to trust and integrity demands that he take the law into his own hands.

Wednesday, May 6th, 7pm (Q&A with Carey McKenzie and Tendeka Matatu) – Walter Reade Theater, Film Society of Lincoln Center; Monday, May 11th, 2pm – Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, Film Society of Lincoln Center


FLYING STARS (U.S. PREMIERE)
Ngardy Conteh George & Allan Tong, Canada, 2014, 50min.
English and Pidgin English with English subtitles

During Sierra Leone’s civil war, rebels amputated countless limbs. Most of the victims are orphans and outcasts in a society that has yet to face its past. For some of them, only the amputee soccer league offers a chance at a better life. (Screening with Ghosts of Amistad)

Saturday, May 16th, 5:30pm (Q&A with Ngardy Conteh George) – Maysles Cinema


GHOSTS OF AMISTAD
English
Tony Buba, USA, 2014, 57min.

Ghosts of Amistad follows a group of historians and a film crew to Sierra Leone, as they attempt to interview elders about surviving local memory of the Amistad case. (Screening with Flying Stars).

Saturday, May 16th, 5:30pm (Q&A with filmmakers) – Maysles Cinema


HEAD GONE
Dare Fasasi, Nigeria /Sweden, 2014, 111 min.
English and Pidgin English with English subtitles

Due to a road mishap, a bus driver loses a group of psychiatric patients on the way to a federal hospital. To cover up the mistake, he and a nurse pick up unsuspecting commuters to substitute the patients. The plot thickens as the new passengers must try to prove their sanity in a psychiatric institution, while the escapees try to adjust to a new environment. A comedy of errors that features some of Nigeria’s finest entertainers.

Saturday, May 9th, 9:45pm – Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, Film Society of Lincoln Center


HOUSEMAIDS (DOMÉSTICA)
Gabriel Mascaro, Brazil, 2013, 76min
Portuguese with English Subtitles

Director Gabriel Mascaro’s engrossing documentary is told in the form of seven vignettes exploring the unique relationships between housemaids and the families they work for in Brazil. Mascaro provided seven teenagers with cameras and asked them to capture the daily routines of their family’s housemaid. From the mundane to the profound, from the humorous to the tragic, the results provide audiences with a glimpse at the complexity of the relationships found between the domestic workers and the families they care for as well as the complex legacy of race and class in modern Brazil.

Saturday, May 23rd, 4:30pm & 9:00pm –  BAM Rose Cinemas


KIRIKOU AND THE SORCERESS (GKIDS Screening)
Michel Ocelot, Senegal/France, 1998, 74min.
French with English Subtitles

The tiny Kirikou is born into an African village upon which a sorceress called Karaba has cast a terrible spell: the spring has dried up, the villagers are being blackmailed, the men of the village have either been kidnapped or have mysteriously disappeared. Karaba is a stunning and cruel woman, surrounded by fearless and servile fetishes. But no sooner has Kirikou delivered himself from his mother’s womb than he wants to rid the village of Karaba’s curse and understand the cause of her wickedness. His adventure-filled voyage leads Kirikou to the Forbidden Mountain, where the Wise Man of the Mountain, who knows of Karaba and her secrets, awaits him.

Sunday, May 24th, 2:00pm – BAM Rose Cinemas

Kirikou

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


LOVE THE ONE YOU LOVE (U.S. PREMIERE)
Jenna Bass, South Africa, 2014, 105min.
English and Xhosa with English subtitles

Across the city of Cape Town, a sex-line operator, a dog handler, and an IT technician begin to suspect that their romantic relationships are the subject of a bizarre conspiracy, involving their friends, family, and possibly even greater forces. Love the One You Love’s parallel stories question the ideals we hold too sacred: love, happiness, and the New South Africa.

Friday, May 8th, 9:00pm – Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, Film Society of Lincoln Center


MAYBE DREAMS CAN COME TRUE
Electra Weston, France/Germany/USA, 2014, 100min.
English, French, German with English subtitles

In this contemporary mix of narrative, experimental and documentary filmmaking, Chocolat is torn between nurturing her love relationship in the USA and maintaining a booming entertainment career in Europe. Looking for answers to her deepest questions, she uses a small video camera to explore and question her life by interviewing her friends abroad.

Saturday, May 16th, 8:00pm (Q&A with Electra Weston) – Maysles Cinema


MELILLENSES (U.S. PREMIERE)
Moisés Salama, Spain, 2004, 76min.
Spanish with English subtitles

A detailed look at the denizens of Melillenses, a border city whose people both bridge and personify the immense gaps between Europe and Africa.

Sunday, May 10th, 1:00pm (Introduction by Beatriz Leal-Riesco) – Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, Film Society of Lincoln Center


MIND OF A CHEF: SENEGAL
Claudia Woloshin, USA/Senegal, 2013, 23min.
English and Wolof with English subtitles

Travel to Senegal with Chef Sean Brock to understand how West Africa influenced the ingredients of America. (Screening with Networks of Hate).

Sunday, May 17th, 4:00pm – Maysles Cinema


MOSSANE
Safi Faye, Senegal, 1996, 105min.
Wolof with English subtitles

Mossane (Magou Seck), a beautiful 14-year-old girl from a rural Senegalese village, is the object of affection to many, including Fara, a poor university student—and even her own brother, Ngor. Although she has long been promised as a bride to the wealthy Diogaye, Mossane falls in love with Fara and on her wedding day, she defies her parents’ wishes and refuses to go through with it.

Tuesday, May 12th, 9:00pm (Introduction by Mamadou Niang) – Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, Film Society of Lincoln Center

4.0.1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


THE NARROW FRAME OF MIDNIGHT (NY PREMIERE)
Tala Hadid, Morocco/France/UK, 2014, 93min.
Arabic and French with English subtitles

Aïcha, a young orphan, is found alone in the forests of central Morocco, after being taken from her home and sold to a petty criminal. Soon after escaping, she crosses paths with Zacaria, a Moroccan/Iraqi writer, who has left everything behind—including a passionate relationship with a teacher, Judith—to search for his missing brother. The trio’s intersecting journeys lead audiences across Morocco, to Istanbul, the plains of Kurdistan, and beyond.

Monday, May 11th, 6:30pm (Q&A with Tala Hadid and Danny Glover) – Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, Film Society of Lincoln Center


NATIONAL DIPLOMA
Dieudo Hamadi, Democratic Republic of the Congo/France, 2014, 92min.
French and Lingala with English subtitles

National Diploma follows a group of Congolese high-school students about to take the state exam in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Dieudo Hamadi’s documentary closely follows them as they prepare for the test, from the benches of the school they are regularly ejected from because they haven’t paid the fees the teachers unfairly inflict upon their students, to the communal house where they gather to study, and the chaotic city streets of Kisangani they walk trying to find a living.

Sunday, May 10th, 9:00pm – Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, Film Society of Lincoln Center


NETWORKS OF HATE (U.S. PREMIERE)
Rokhaya Diallo, France, 2014, 52min.
French with English subtitles

Key areas of expression, today’s social and internet networks have become an outlet through which the most racist, homophobic, and sexist ideas are expressed.

Sunday, May 17th, 4:00pm (Q&A with Rokhaya Diallo) – Maysles Cinema

Rokhaya Diallo poster film


PIRATING PIRATES
David Čálek, Czech Republic/Kenya/Somalia, 2014, 85min.
Czech, English, Somali with English subtitles

Intending to make a film about piracy in Somalia, the filmmakers of Pirating Pirates had no idea that they’d have to lay their original plans aside. The film takes a surprising turn as they become entangled in a web of lies and deception.

Thursday, May 14th, 7:00pm (Q&A with the producer) – Maysles Cinema


PLOT FOR PEACE
Carlos Agulló and Mandy Jacobson, South Africa, 2014, 84min.
English, French, Portuguese, Afrikaans, Spanish with English subtitles

A fascinating account of off-the-books diplomacy in the 1980s, Plot for Peace is that rare documentary that both augments the historical record and is paced like a thriller. “Plot” tells the little-known tale of Jean-Yves Ollivier, a French commodities trader who made his fortune doing business, he says, in “difficult countries” — including the internationally shunned South Africa. In 1981 he concluded that apartheid was unsustainable and began to use his contacts to help make sure its end came peacefully.

Thursday, May 7th, 6:30pm (Q&A with Jean-Yves Ollivier and Mandy Jacobson) – Walter Reade Theater, Film Society of Lincoln Center


PORTRAIT OF A LONE FARMER
Jide Tom Akinleminu, Denmark/Germany, 2013, 75min.
Danish, English, Yoruba with English subtitles

Portrait of a Lone Farmer is a feature documentary about a Danish-Nigerian family torn apart by geography. When Jide, for the first time in five years, visits his father’s poultry farm, we see through his camera the unfolding of a story about family, love, and legacy. It is a quiet and stunning portrait of a broken family trying to heal.

Saturday, May 16th, 4:00pm (Q&A with Jide Tom Akinleminu) – Maysles Cinema


THE PROPHECY (U.S. PREMIERE)
Marcia Juzga, Senegal, 2015, 20min.
French and Wolof with English subtitles

Concerned about the environmental issues facing Senegal, photographer Fabrice Monteiro, in collaboration with the designer Jah Gal, created “The Prophecy,” a project with the objective of raising awareness among the Senegalese population and the rest of the world. The project’s series of surrealist photographs detail the sites most representative of Senegal’s environmental destruction. The essence of each site is characterized by a jinn—a supernatural genie omnipresent in African cultures—merging with its environment. The documentary The Prophecy details the creative and technical process behind the making of the photographs. (Screening with 100% Dakar – More Than Art)

Saturday, May 9th at 4:15pm; Tuesday, May 12th at 4pm – Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, Film Society of Lincoln Center

Screen Shot 2015-03-09 at 8.30.21 PM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


RED LEAVES (U.S. PREMIERE) – Centerpiece Film
Bazi Gete, Israel, 2014, 80min.
Amharic and Hebrew with English subtitles

Meseganio Tadela, 74, immigrated to Israel from Ethiopia 28 years ago with his family. He has chosen to zealously retain his culture, talks very little, and hardly speaks Hebrew. After losing his wife, Meseganio sets out on a journey that leads him through his children’s homes. He comes to realize that he belongs to a rapidly disappearing class that believes in retaining Ethiopian culture. As this harsh reality begins to hit him, he struggles to survive according to his own rules.

Friday, May 8th, 6:45pm (Q&A with Bazi Gete); Sunday, May 10th, 4:15pm (Q&A with Bazi Gete) – Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, Film Society of Lincoln Center


THE ROAD WE TRAVEL (NY PREMIERE)
Aidan Belizaire, Uganda/UK, 2014, 38min.
English and Swahili with English subtitles

After arriving in Uganda without any money, a downtrodden photographer befriends a local taxi driver who offers him a place to stay, forcing him to embrace a culture very different to his own. (Screening with National Diploma)

Sunday, May 10th, 9:00pm – Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, Film Society of Lincoln Center


RUN (NY PREMIERE)
Philippe Lacôte, France/Ivory Coast, 2014, 100min.
French with English subtitles

Run finds shelter with fellow dissident Assa (Isaach de Bankolé) after assassinating the Prime Minister of the Ivory Coast. While in hiding, Run’s story is revealed in three separate flashbacks—his childhood with Tourou, when his dream was to become a rainmaker; his adventures with Gladys, the competitive eater; and his past as a young member of a militia, amid conflict in the Ivory Coast—which together speak volumes about contemporary life in the troubled country. Philippe Lacôte’s feature-film debut is a mesmerizing coming-of-age tale, alternately dreamlike and ultra-realistic.

Monday, May 11th, 9:00pm (Q&A with Isaach de Bankolé and Philippe Lacote) – Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, Film Society of Lincoln Center


SHIELD AND SPEAR
Petter Ringbom, South Africa, 89min.
English, Afrikaans, and Zulu with English subtitles

This documentary spotlights the changing political climate of South Africa, where a revolution is taking place as artists, musicians and designers tackle issues of politics, race and history. This newest film by director Petter Ringbom follows some of the most recognized artists in South Africa today, exploring what it means to live and work in the new democracy. Artist Brett Murray’s painted caricature of South African president Jacob Zuma results in a lawsuit and death threats. Photographer and activist Zanele Muholi’s work exposes hate crimes in the LGBT community. The Smarteez design collective creates international styles while running a free after-school program for kids. Musician Xander Ferreira of Gazelle parades on stage as a character based on an archetypal African dictator. Shield and Spear presents intimate stories about the artists, art, music, identity, race and freedom of expression in South Africa 20 years into democracy.

Friday, May 22nd, 7:00pm (Q&A with Petter Ringbom) – BAM Rose Cinemas


SOBUKWE: A GREAT SOUL (U.S. PREMIERE)
Mickey Madoda Dube, South Africa, 2011, 100min.
English

This film celebrates the life of Robert Mangaliso Sobukwe, restoring him to his rightful place as a leading figure in South African history. Despite his pivotal role in the struggle for liberation (and as the founder of the Pan Africanist Congress), there isn’t a single piece of archive of the man who was once one of the most watched, recorded, and popular political prisoners in the world. Even the current South African government has failed to recognize his place in history and the relevance of his message today. Mickey Madoda Dube’s film seeks to fill that gap, standing as a monument to a great man, a global visionary, teacher, political leader, philosopher, and humanist who was well ahead of his time, declaring his commitment to a “non-racial” society in a racist world by asserting that “there is only one race, the human race.”

Wednesday, May 6th, 9:00pm (Introduction and Q&A by Micky Madoda Dube) – Walter Reade Theater, Film Society of Lincoln Center; Friday, May 8th, 4:00pm – Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, Film Society of Lincoln Center


“SPECIAL Work-in-Progress Screening”
French with English subtitles

Senegalese political documentary

Sunday, May 10th, 6:30pm – Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, Film Society of Lincoln Center


STORIES OF OUR LIVES
Jim Chuchu, Kenya, 2014, 62min.
English and Swahili with English subtitles

Created by the members of The Nest Collective, a Nairobi-based arts collective, the film is an anthology of five shorts dramatizing true stories of LGBT life in Kenya.

Thursday, May 7th, 9:00pm – Walter Reade Theater, Film Society of Lincoln Center; Monday, May 11th, 4:00pm – Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, Film Society of Lincoln Center


SURRENDER
Celine Gilbert, Tanzania, 2000, 30min.
Swahili with English subtitles

In the tranquil setting of a small fishing community on the east coast of Zanzibar, a fire is raging in the hearts of three young individuals and the entire community feels the heat. Surrender is a story about Amri, a man trapped between the traditional role of the family man his father expects him to fulfill, and his personal desire for Mashua, a local fisherman. (Screening with Stories of Our Lives)

Thursday, May 7th, 9:00pm – Walter Reade Theater, Film Society of Lincoln Center; Monday, May 11th, 4:00pm – Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, Film Society of Lincoln Center


TIMBUKTU
Abderrahmane Sissako, Mauritania, 2014, 97min.
Arabic, Bambara, French, Songhay, and Tamashek with English subtitles

Not far from Timbuktu, now ruled by the religious fundamentalists, Kidane lives peacefully in the dunes with his wife Satima, his daughter Toya, and Issan, their twelve-year-old shepherd. In town, the people suffer, powerless, from the regime of terror imposed by the Jihadists determined to control their faith. Music, laughter, cigarettes, even soccer have been banned. The women have become shadows but resist with dignity. Every day, the new improvised courts issue tragic and absurd sentences. Kidane and his family are being spared the chaos that prevails in Timbuktu. But their destiny changes when Kidane accidentally kills Amadou, the fisherman who slaughtered “GPS,” his beloved cow. He now has to face the new laws of the foreign occupants.

Saturday, May 23rd, 2:00pm & 6:45pm – BAM Rose Cinemas


WINTER OF DISCONTENT
Ibrahim El Batout, Egypt, 2012, 96min.
Arabic with English and French subtitles

Set against the momentous backdrop of the whirlwind protests of Cairo’s Tahrir Square that began on January 25th, 2011, this film by independent director Ibrahim El Batout takes us on a compellingly raw, starkly moving journey into the lives of activist Amr (Amr Waked), journalist Farah (Farah Youssef) and State Security officer Adel (Salah AlHanafy) as they experience a shifting reality in the days and nights leading up to the resignation of President Mubarak. Winter of Discontent poetically evokes the pivotal events that changed the face of Egypt forever. As the stories of these characters unfold, we are propelled into the heady, often surreal atmosphere of terror, uncertainty and mass euphoria that surrounded those days that shaped history, and that continue to do so. It exposes the anger, the deceits and the lies that people faced every day during the years of Moubarak’s rule.

Monday, May 25th, 4:00pm & 8:45pm – BAM Rose Cinemas


YOU LAUGH BUT IT’S TRUE
David Paul Meyer, South Africa/USA, 2011, 84min.
English

The Daily Show’s new host, Trevor Noah, was born to an interracial couple in South Africa, at a time when such a union was illegal. You Laugh But It’s True reveals the story of an outsider who has somehow figured out a way to relate to everyone through his comedy.

Friday, May 15th, 7:30pm – Maysles Cinema


ZIARA. BEYOND THE THRESHOLD (ZIARA. MÁS ALLÁ DEL UMBRAL) (NY PREMIERE)
Sonia Gámez, Spain, 2013, 54min.
Spanish with English subtitles

A documentary focusing on the Morabitos, or Marabouts, important sites of religious pilgrimage in northern Morocco, and the precarious situation they are now in due to repression from Islamic radicals. (Screening with Melillenses)

Sunday, May 10th, 1:00pm (Introduction by Beatriz Leal-Riesco) – Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, Film Society of Lincoln Center

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SHORTS PROGRAM #1:  AFRIPEDIA SERIES

AFRIPEDIA (U.S. PREMIERE)
Teddy Goitum, Benjamin Taft and Senay Berhe, Kenya/Angola/Senegal/Ghana/South Africa/Sweden, 2015, 140min (28min x 5 episodes).
English, French and Portuguese with English subtitles

Afripedia is a five-part short documentary series produced by the Swedish collective Stocktown. Shot in Kenya, Ghana, Angola, Senegal, and South Africa, each of the five episodes focus on a different group of artists and creators in their respective country.

KENYA

Through the stories of its key talents, Afripedia, Kenya takes an intimate look at Nairobi’s urban culture scene and its leading personalities and stars. Meet 3D-artist, Andrew Kaggia, creator of a 3D-animated political short film, taking you to his futuristic vision of Nairobi and proving that disability is never inability. Afro-futuristic pop band and DIY-enthusiasts, Just a Band redefine music videos, while visual artist, Cyrus introduces us to his remarkable collection of “Boobs,” created solely with found materials.

ANGOLA

Welcome to Angola, home of heavy electro music known as kuduro. Follow us across the pulsating city of Luanda, as we delve into the kuduro revolution and meet the people charting its course. Afripedia, Angola portrays a city bursting with creativity and discovers the capital from an alternative viewpoint. Get swept away by a line-up of emerging talents such as transsexual superstar Titica, wordsmith genius artist Nástio Mosquito, producer MC Sacerdote, and more.

SENEGAL

In Afripedia, Senegal, we meet fashion designer Selly Raby Kane, who sculpts the digital image of a future alien city in an old railway station. Photographer Omar Victor Diop playfully reimagines Hollywood’s most iconic images with a Senegalese twist, while dancer Khoudia Roodia is organizing and building for a future where Africa dominates street dance. Beatmaker Fanny from the Ivory Coast is defying society’s boundaries to create a future for female artists and organizers.

GHANA

The whispers among those in the know are saying that Accra is the next big hotspot for African cultural production and Afripedia, Ghana suggests they’re not wrong. Meet outspoken and androgynous music star Wiyaala, as well as exciting trick-bikers whose BMX skills and flamboyant style have taken neighborhoods by storm. Visual artist Afrogallonism puts on extraordinary outdoor performances to highlight environmental issues. Welcome to Creativity!

SOUTH AFRICA

Twenty years after liberation, Afripedia, South Africa portrays a diverse new generation. Starting out in in Cape Town, we meet up with the video game label 2bop and the inventor of the new limpop music genre, Gazelle. Continuing on to Johannesburg, we join heavy metal band Ree-burth for a block party and take a tour around Soweto with the local style-setters Smarteez and their colorful street-savvy fashion.

Saturday, May 9th, 6:3opm (Q&A with Teddy Goitom) – Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, Film Society of Lincoln Center


SHORTS PROGRAM #2: WOMEN IN THE MEDIA (total 113min.)

THE SUMMER OF GODS
Eliciana Nascimento, Brazil, 2014, 20min.
Portuguese with English subtitles

A young girl named Lili connects with her Afro-Brazilian religious heritage on a summer visit with family to their ancestral village in rural Brazil. During her stay, she encounters orishas (African gods) who help her find peace with a gift that had previously vexed her.

BURKINA, ALL ABOUT WOMEN (U.S. PREMIERE)
Nicole Mackinlay Hahn, USA/Burkina Faso, 2015, 11min.
French and Mooré with English subtitles

Seeking to undo stereotypes about African women by looking at the professional lives of women in Burkina Faso, the film talks to a firefighter, a swimmer, a mushroom biologist, a mechanic, an astrophysicist, a rapper, and more—allowing women (all inspired by the legendary Princess Yennenga) to give voice to their own unique experience.

burkina all women

HANDMADE IN THAMAGA (NY PREMIERE)
Nova Scott-James, USA/Botswana, 2014, 5min.
English and Setswana with English subtitles

Handmade in Thamaga chronicles the founding and work of Bothlalo Centre, a women’s pottery collective and business in the small rural village of Thamaga, Botswana.

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BUS NUT
Akosua Adoma Owusu, Ghana/USA, 2014, 7min.
English

Bus Nut rearticulates the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott, a political and social protest against U.S. racial segregation on the public transit system of Montgomery, Alabama, and its relationship to an educational video on school-bus safety. Actress MaameYaa Boafo restages a vintage video while reciting press-conference audio of Rosa Parks on a re-created set in New York City.

bus nut

SISTER OYO (SOEUR OYO)
Monique Mbeka Phoba, Belgium/Democratic Republic of the Congo, 2014, 24min.
French with English subtitles

Set in the Belgian Congo in the 1950s, Sister Oyo tells the story of Godelive, a schoolgirl at the Catholic boarding school Mbanza-Mboma, the premier French-language school for Congolese girls. She is to be westernized, following the will of her parents, but the memory of her grandmother intervenes…

soeur oyo

CHOLO (NY PREMIERE)
Muzna Almusafer, United Arab Emirates/France, 2014, 21min.
Swahili with English subtitles

The dark-skinned 11-year-old Cholo meets his fair-skinned younger stepbrother Abdullah for the first time. Although strikingly different, the two boys enjoy a crackling chemistry.

PANIC BUTTON (NY PREMIERE)
Libby Dougherty, South Africa, 2014, 25min.
English and Zulu with English subtitles

From the moment that Tshepo, a security guard, breaks through Jenny’s multi-locked door to save her, she feels as if she’s been swept off her feet. But as Jenny imagines herself falling in love with him, an unhealthy, delusional obsession begins to take shape.

Tuesday, May 12th, 6:00pm (Introduction by MaameYaa Boafo and Nova Scott-James) – Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center, Film Society of Lincoln Center


SHORTS PROGRAM #3: FILMAFRICA (total 96min.)

BELEH
Eka Christa Assam, Cameroon, 2013, 26min.
Pidgin with English subtitles

Set in a small village at the foot of Mount Fako in Cameroon, Beleh examines the relationship between Ekema and his heavily pregnant wife, Joffi. The difficulty she faces in her first pregnancy is made worse by the petulant and selfish demands of her irate and uncompromising husband. Things come to a head when one morning, the situation mysteriously changes in the village and there’s a total role reversal between the sexes. Ekema (who’s the only one who seems to be aware of the change) gets to experience a day as a pregnant man and his experiences throw a whole new light on his view of Joffi’s feelings.

CURSE OF AN ADDICT
Lovinsa Kavuma, Zanzibar / Tanzania, 2013, 25min.
Swahili with English subtitles

In Zanzibar, Seif, a 28-year-old heroin addict believes he is cursed. In a battle to be free from a life where he contracted HIV, Seif seeks help from a Shiek. In a spiritual exorcism, the curse from his past is conjured up. Having confronted his demons, only time will tell whether Seif can lead a clean life as a true Muslim.

SOKO SONKO
Ekwa Msangi, Kenya/USA, 2014, 22min.
Kiswahili and Sheng with English subtitles

When her mom gets sick, Kibibi’s dad must take her to the market to get her hair braided before school begins. Soko Sonko is a hilarious, fish-out-of-water roller-coaster of a journey, about a well-intended dad who goes where no man has gone before… because only women have been there.

WOODEN HAND
Kaouther Ben Hania, Tunisia/France, 2013, 23min.
Arabic with English subtitles

Five-year-old Amira lives with her mother in a small apartment in Tunis. On the day that she’s supposed to return to the Koranic school, Amira was dearly wishing to enjoy the few remaining hours of her holiday. She managed to find nothing better to do than to attach her hand to the chair with super glue…

Friday, May 22nd, 9:30pm – BAM Rose Cinemas

2014 New York African Film Festival Program Guide

The following program guide lists the features and shorts scheduled to screen at the 2014 New York African Film Festival. This guide begins with information on our Opening Night Reception Exhibition and on our special co-presentation of “Coeur de Lion” with the United Nations’ Department of Public Information. The line-up is then organized alphabetically, and each film or program of films is followed by its showtime and a trailer (if there is an available trailer).

ART SHOW: DIGITAL AFRICA WEDNESDAY, MAY 7 – TUESDAY, MAY 13

Frieda and Roy Furman Gallery – Free & Open to the Public

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Digital Africa features the works of Congolese and American photographers. The first portion, Congolese Dreams, showcases the works of acclaimed photographer Baudouin Mouanda and a collective of artists, acting as a companion to Philippe Cordey’s short film of the same name, which will screen during the festival. The exhibition will also feature Adama Delphine Fawundu’s stunning portraits capturing the residents of Tivoli Towers in Crown Heights, Brooklyn – home to more than 350 families, who are mostly of African descent – as well as portraits of young musician-activists from Nigeria and the U.S.

 

SPECIAL SCREENING AT THE UNITED NATIONS (WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 6:30PM):

LION HEART (COEUR DE LION)

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Boubacar Diallo, Burkina Faso, 2007, 90min.

A lion wreaks havoc when it attacks the village livestock. Several people disappear. Samba manages to kill the lion and discovers that the chief’s advisor is involved in slave-trafficking.

RSVP required before May 12:  http://bit.ly/1hwFBxx; Info: gerardl@un.org

Co-presented by the UN Remembrance program of the Victims of Slavery and the Transatlantic Slave Trade and the International Organization of La Francophonie.

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2014 NYAFF FILMS

A LOT LIKE YOU

Eliaichi Kimaro, Tanzania/USA, 2011, 80min.

Eliaichi Kimaro is a mixed-race, first-generation American with a Tanzanian father and Korean mother. When her retired father moves back to Tanzania, Eliaichi begins to examine the intricate fabric of her multi-racial identity.

May 18, 4:00pm

 

ANGANO, ANGANO

César Paes & Marie Clémence Paes, Madagascar/France, 1989, 64min.

This pioneering work of ethnographic filmmaking takes oral tradition itself as its central character. Passing down the wisdom of the ancestors through myths and folktales, venerable storytellers recount the founding myths of Malagasy culture.

May 24 at 2:00pm, 7:00pm

 

AYA OF YOP CITY (Animation) 

Marguerite Abouet & Clement Oubrerie,

Côte d’Ivoire/France, 2013, 85min.

Tracking the adventures of a 19-year-old girl living in in the neighborhood of Yopougon, a working-class suburb of Abidjan, the film offers up an intriguing snapshot of West African life in the 1970s, with a fanciful vintage soundtrack to boot.

May 8, 4:30pm; May 11, 9:00pm 

 

B FOR BOY (NY PREMIERE)

Chika Anadu, Nigeria, 2013, 118min.

A contemporary drama set in Nigeria about one woman’s desperate need for a male child. The film explores the discrimination of women in the name of culture and religion.

May 18, 7:00 PM

 

BASTARDS (US PREMIERE)

Deborah Perkin, Morocco/UK, 2013, 93min.

At 14, Rabha El Haimer was an illiterate child bride. Ten years later, she is a single mother, fighting to legalize her sham marriage and secure a future for her illegitimate daughter. Bastards follows Rabha’s fight from the slums to the high courts.

May 9, 4:00pm; May 12, 6:00pm (Q&A with Deborah Perkin) 

 

BELEH (NY PREMIERE)

Eka Christa Assam, Cameroon, 2013, 30min.

Ekema’s hard and uncompromising attitude toward his very pregnant wife, Joffi, is quickly revised when he has to spend an entire day in her shoes..

May 9, 4:00pm; May 12, 6:00pm (Q&A with Deborah Perkin) 

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BONESHAKER

Frances Bodomo, Ghana/USA, 2012, 12min.

Boneshaker follows a Ghanaian immigrant family taking a road trip to a Pentecostal church in Louisiana to cure their problem child. Starring Oscar-nominee Quvenzhané Wallis.

May 24, 4:30pm, 9pm

 

BURN IT UP DJASSA

Lonesome Solo, Côte d’Ivoire, 2012, 70min.

After the deaths of his parents, Tony makes a living selling cigarettes. Looking for easy money, he turns to gambling and is dragged further into the seedy underworld of Wassakara.

May 26, 4:30pm, 9:00pm

 

CASSA, CASSA (US PREMIERE)

Elodie Lefebvre, Senegal, 2013, 51min.

Germaine Acogny, a leading figure in contemporary African dance and the founder of the Ecole des Sables in Senegal, brings together 35 choreographers of African descent for two weeks of invigorating creative exchange.

May 24, 4:30pm, 9pm

Cassa Lena Blou danse

THE CHILD OF THE SUN (US PREMIERE)

Taieb Louhichi, Tunisia, 2014, 78min.

After an evening at a nightclub and an early morning swim, three young people sneak into a villa, where they unexpectedly meet the mysterious owner.

May 23, 4:30pm, 9:15pm

Childofthesun

COLUMBITE TANTALITE (NY PREMIERE)

Chiwetel Ejiofor, UK, 2013, 12min.

Chiwetel Ejiofor’s short film explores the western exploitation of Africa’s most coveted minerals as well as the DRC’s reconciliation process with its history and identity.

Columbite Tantalite

CONFUSION NA WA (NY PREMIERE)

Kenneth Gyang, Nigeria, 2013, 105min.

When a cellphone is found by two opportunists, they decide to blackmail the owner. Their scheme sets in motion an unintended chain of events.

May 7, 7:30pm (Q&A with Kenneth Gyang); May 10, 9:15pm (Q&A with Kenneth Gyang)

 

CULTURAL HEALING COMMUNITY CINEMA PROJECT – SUDAN (US PREMIERE)

The Cultural Healing project trained Sudanese journalism students, civil society representatives and young people to make short documentary films that expressed their cultures and traditions.

May 17th, 4:00pm

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ABUNA

Mudzamil, Sudan, 2013, 11min.

A touching tribute to Ami Abdalseed, the caretaker and cook for the Red Sea High-School for Boys. A generation of students fondly recollect their memories of Abdalseed.

COMING SOON

Mustafa Jawhar & Hind Elsheikh,

Sudan, 2013, 16min.

The film tells the story of an abandoned cinema in Kosti, a town in the White Nile State. The filmmakers and the whole town pay tribute to the cinema they remember.

THE CRYING SEA

Aladin Reyhan & Hashim Fath Alrahman,

Sudan, 2013, 12min.

The Crying Sea celebrates the gift of the Red Sea to the city of Port Sudan and makes an urgent plea to its citizens to wake up to the consequences of sea pollution.

NILE DRUMS

Mohamed Abdalaziem, (aka Fox),

Sudan, 2013, 14min.

This film follows a Southern Sudanese musician as he bids a prolonged and bittersweet farewell to Khartoum, the city in which he grew up, before his repatriation to South Sudan.

ONLY A CHILD

Eltahir Daoud, Sudan, 2013, 10min.

The story of a young boy who has given up his schooling so his brothers can continue with their education.

TAYBA

Maha Abdalmoniem, Sudan, 2013, 11min.

An intimate portrait of the filmmaker’s aunt as she, from the repose of old age, recollects how she overcame the stigma of divorce and forged life on her own.

TRAIN OF LONGING

Najwa Yassin, Sudan, 2013, 11min.

Atbara was once known as the city of iron and steel, with a railway that made it one of the most cosmopolitan and prosperous corners of Sudan. This film tells the tale of how the coming of railway changed a city and its population.

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CURSE OF AN ADDICT (US PREMIERE)

Lovinsa Kavuma, Zanzibar/Tanzania, 2013, 25min.

Seif, a young Muslim heroin addict, believes he is cursed. In a battle to be freed from his addiction, Seif seeks help from a sheikh.

May 18, 4:00pm

 

FAISAL GOES WEST (NY PREMIERE)

Bentley Brown, Sudan/USA, 2013, 34min.

A family moves from Sudan to the U.S. in search of a better life, but they soon discover they must weather the economic crisis.

May 24, 4:30pm, 9pm

 

FELIX (NY PREMIERE)

Roberta Durrant, South Africa, 2013, 97min.

The young Felix Xaba dreams of becoming a saxophonist like his late father, but his mother thinks jazz is the devil’s music. When Felix gets a scholarship to an elite private school, he defies his mother and begins preparations for the school jazz concert.

May 25, 2:00pm

 

FUELLING POVERTY

Ishaya Bako, Nigeria, 2012, 28min.

An artistic depiction of the failings of fuel subsidy management in Nigeria, Fuelling Poverty graphically captures the various contours of the fuel subsidy debate and offers a rallying cry for change in Nigeria by the Occupy Nigeria movement.

May 26, 4:30pm, 9:00pm

 

GRIGRIS (NY PREMIERE)

Mahamat-Saleh Haroun, Chad/France, 2013, 101min.

Despite a bum leg, Grigris has hopes of becoming a professional dancer. His dreams are tested when his stepfather falls critically ill and he’s forced to risk his future by smuggling oil to pay the hospital bills.

May 8, 8:45pm; May 12, 3:45pm

 

HALF OF A YELLOW SUN (NY PREMIERE)

Biyi Bandele, Nigeria/UK, 2013, 111min.

Based on Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s bestselling novel, Half of a Yellow Sun is set during the Nigerian-Biafran war in the 1960s, and follows two middle class Nigerian twins as their settled lives are torn apart by the conflict.

May 9, 7:00pm (Q&A with Biyi Bandele and some cast members)

 

IT’S US (NI SI SI) (US PREMIERE)

Nick Reding, Kenya, 2013, 88min.

It’s Us portrays a typical Kenyan community: a harmonious muddle of tribes, intermarriages, and extended families who place no stock in which tribe their neighbor comes from. Then one day, rumors begin to spread and suddenly mistrust takes hold.

May 8, 6:00pm (Q&A with Nick Reding); May 12, 1:45pm

 

THE LAST SONG BEFORE THE WAR

Kiley Kraskouskas, Mali/USA, 2012, 90min.

Last Song Before the War captures the inspiring rise and uncertain future of Mali’s annual Festival in the Desert and subtly reveals the challenges and triumphs of creating an artistic event under such challenging economic and political circumstances.

May 16, 7:00pm

 

LEGENDS OF MADAGASCAR

Haminiaina Ratovoarivony, Madagascar, 2012, 93min.

Jim and his friends Bob and Dylan, travel to see Jim’s father, who is seriously ill. Charu, a young woman, joins them, awakening the interest of the three boys and converting the trip into a kind of initiatory journey showing the challenges faced by Madagascar’s youth.

May 23 at 2:00pm, 7:00pm

 

LIVING FUNERAL (ΝΥ PREMIERE)

Udoka Oyeka, Nigeria, 2013, 21min.

Set against the backdrop of delusional stability, a young girl in the last days of her life battling with breast cancer, arranges a farewell for her family to help ease their pain; a celebration of life… A living funeral.

 

MINERS SHOT DOWN (US PREMIERE)

Rehad Desai, South Africa, 2014, 85min.

In August 2012, mineworkers in one of South Africa’s biggest platinum mines began a strike for better wages. Six days later, the police used live ammunition to brutally suppress the strike, killing 34 and injuring many more. What emerges is the country’s first post-colonial massacre.

May 15, 7:00pm (Q&A via Skype with Rehad Desai)

 

MUGABE: VILLAIN OR HERO?

Roy Agyemang, Zimbabwe/UK, 2012, 116min.

Mugabe: Villain or Hero? explores the reality behind the headlines with unprecedented access to Mugabe and his entourage. This film raises serious issues about the relationship between African leaders and the West in the fight for African resources.

May 7, 2:00pm; May 11, 6:15pm

 

NAIROBI HALF LIFE

David Tosh Gitonga, Kenya, 2012, 96min.

Mwas is a young aspiring actor who moves from his home village to Nairobi to make it big. But as he moves toward his dream of taking center stage, he finds himself drawn into a world of small-time crooks and deceit.

May 25, 4:30, 9:00pm

 

NEW AFRICAN SHORTS:

May 8, 2:00pm; May 11, 3:30pm  (Q&A with Iquo B. Essien, Akosua Adoma Owusu, Ekwa Msangi-Omari, Kenya, Frances Bodomo and Ntare Guma Mbaho Mwine) 

AFRONAUTS

Frances Bodomo, Ghana/USA, 2014, 15min.

On July 16 1969, America prepares to launch Apollo 11. Thousands of miles away, the Zambia Space Academy hopes to beat America to the moon.

AISSA’S STORY (US PREMIERE)

Iquo B. Essien, Nigeria/USA, 2013, 15min.

An African immigrant housekeeper and single mother must decide whether to move on with her life or fight when the case against her assaulter is dismissed.

BAUDOUIN MOUANDA: CONGOLESE DREAMS   (US PREMIERE)

Philippe Cordey, Congo, 2012, 25min.

Photographer Baudouin Mouanda explores beauty in unlikely places – by asking women to pose in the same white wedding dress in different locations – from rubbish dumps to crowded trains.

KUHANI (NY PREMIERE)

Ntare Guma Mbaho Mwine, Uganda, 2013, 7min.

An experimental short inspired by a Ugandan priest’s open letter to the Church in response to the country’s recently passed Anti Homosexuality Act.

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KWAKU ANANSE (NY PREMIERE)

Akosua Adoma Owusu, Ghana/Mexico/USA, 2013, 26min.

The traditional West African fable of Kwaku Ananse is combined with the story of a young outsider named Nyan Koronhwea attending her estranged father’s funeral. Overwhelmed by the procession, she escapes into the spirit world in search of her father.

SOKO SONKO (THE MARKET KING) (US PREMIERE)

Ekwa Msangi-Omari, Kenya/USA, 2014, 22min.

When her mom gets sick, Kibibi’s dad takes her to the market to get her hair braided before school. Soko Sonko is a hilarious, fish-out-of-water journey, about a well-intentioned dad who goes where no man has gone before…

Writer-Director-EKWA-MSANGI-OMARI

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NINAH’S DOWRY (ΝΥ PREMIERE)

Victor Viyuoh, Cameron, 2012, 95min.

Co-presented by Human Rights Watch Film Festival

Ninah, a mother of three, is stuck in an abusive relationship with no hope of change. Her family lives off her meager earnings, but she decides to run away.

May 9, 2:00pm; May 13, 6:30pm

 

OF GOOD REPORT (ΝΥ PREMIERE)

Jahmil X.T. Qubeka, South Africa, 2013, 109min.

Schoolteacher Parker Sithole arrives in a rural village with no local connections. He begins an illicit affair with one of his new pupils, 16-year-old Nolitha, which proves to be a disastrous development for both.

May 10, 6:30pm (Q&A with Jahmil XT Qubeka); May 12, 9:00pm (Q&A with Jahmil XT Qubeka) 

 

THE PROMISE

Akin Okunrinboye, Nigeria/USA, 2013, 6min.

Kemi has been with Femi for five years now. She is tired of waiting, especially since the relationship does not seem to be going anywhere. It’s the New Year, and it is time for progress.

May 25, 4:30, 9:00pm

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RÊVE KAKUDJI

Ibbe Daniëls & Koen Vidal, Congo/Belgium, 2013, 73min.

Ever since Serge Kakudji heard the sounds of opera for the first time as a young boy on Congolese television, he has dreamt to make it to the top of the classical opera world.

May 17, 7:30 PM

 

SARRAOUNIA 

Med Hondo, Burkina Faso/Mauritania/France, 1986, 120min.

A young warrior queen of the Azna tribe uses her mastery of traditional martial arts and pharmacology to defend her people from an attack by a neighbouring tribe. But the real trial of strength comes when she is faced with the conquering French army.

May 13, 9:00pm 

 

SODIQ (NY PREMIERE)

Adeyemi Michael, Nigeria/ UK, 2013, 44min.

How does a boy with the aspirations of becoming a doctor find himself on trial for murder?

May 17, 7:30pm

 

SOMETHING NECESSARY (NY PREMIERE)

Judy Kibinge, Kenya/Germany, 2013, 85min.

An intimate moment in the life of Anne, a woman struggling to rebuild her life after Kenya’s post-election violence of 2008 which claimed the life of her husband, the health of her son, and left her isolated farm in ruins.

May 25, 7:00pm

 

WHEN THE STARS MEET THE SEA

Raymond Rajaonarivelo, Madagascar, 1996, 85min.

A poetic exploration of traditional and modern concepts of freedom set within the landscapes of Madagascar.

May 26, 2:00pm, 7:00pm

 

WINTER OF DISCONTENT (US PREMIERE)

Ibrahim El Batout, Egypt, 2012, 96min.

Co-presented by 3rd i NY and Alwan for the Arts

Set against the backdrop of the 2011 protests in Cairo’s Tahrir Square, director Ibrahim El Batout takes us on a raw, moving journey into the lives of an activist, a journalist, and a state security officer.

May 7, 4:30pm; May 11, 1:00pm

 

WOODEN HANDS (US PREMIERE)

Kaouther Ben Hania, Tunisia, 2013, 23min.

Co-presented by 3rd i NY and Alwan for the Arts

Five-year-old Amira lives with her mother in a small apartment in Tunis. On the day that she’s supposed to return to school, Amira finds nothing better to do than to attach her hand to a chair with superglue…

May 7, 4:30pm; May 11, 1:00pm

2014 New York African Film Festival Tickets

The 21st New York African Film Festival’s main venues are Film Society of Lincoln Center, Maysles Cinema Institute, and BAMcinématek. The following information will direct you to the relevant sales portal for every venue and its address. We look forward to welcoming you to this year’s festival!

For more information on the films scheduled at the 2014 New York African Film Festival, check out our program guide by clicking here.

OPENING NIGHT RECEPTION AND FESTIVAL CELEBRATION:

NYAFF Tickets for the Opening Night Reception and Film on May 7 are $50.00. You can buy your Opening Night Reception and Screening tickets by clicking here.

Please note that the “Half of a Yellow Sun” tickets have SOLD OUT until further notice. At this time, we invite you to sign up on the waiting list for our May 9 Festival Celebration Party and Film by clicking here.

We will update our patrons on Thursday, April 24th, 2014. Thank you for your support!

FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER:

General Admission $13, Students & Seniors (62+) $9, FSLC members $8.

Online: http://filmlinc.com/african

In Person: Film Society box offices.

Discount packages start at $30 for the General Public; $24 for students and seniors (62+); 3+ films packages start at $21 for Film Society members.

Address(es): Walter Reade Theater, 165 West 65th St., and the Elinor Bunin

Munroe Film Center, 144 West 65th St.,  between Broadway and Amsterdam Ave., upper level. 

MAYSLES CINEMA:

Suggested donation: $10. Visit www.mayslesfilms.com or call 212 582 6050.

Address: 343 Lenox Avenue, between 127th & 128th Streets.

BAMCINÉMATEK:

Tickets: $13 per screening for adults; $9 for seniors 65 and over, children under

twelve, and students 25 and under with valid I.D. Monday–Thursday, except holidays; $7 for BAM Cinema Club members.

Buy online: www.bam.org/BAMcinématek

By phone at 718-777-FILM

Address: BAM Rose Cinemas, 30 Lafayette Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11217

For more information please e-mail AFF at nyaff@erols.com or call 212-352-1720 

The 21st New York African Film Festival Statement

“REVOLUTION AND LIBERATION IN THE DIGITAL AGE”

In Africa and its diaspora, revolution is not always synonymous with the overthrowing of a government or a head of state. It is also the relentless search for liberation of the body and the mind that has characterized the history of African people through the years. Arising as a chain of movements led mostly by the youth and women, revolution is a force against unfair systems, an impulse for the people to follow their own dreams, and a shared experience of empowerment.  In the Digital Age, the struggle for liberation has found a resilient ally in technology, which has exerted multiplier effects in and outside the continent.

This is the core of the 21st New York African Film Festival: the experience of revolution and liberation in and from Africa in the twenty-first century. All of the films featured will tackle the path to liberation or the feeling of freedom itself:  its impact, its agents, but first and foremost its visual splendor.

Under this heading, this month-long multi-venue event will present a unique selection of contemporary and classic African films, running the gamut from features, shorts, and documentaries to experimental films, along with supplementary educational programs. Filmmakers and actors will also attend the screenings and Q&A sessions.

LINCOLN CENTER (MAY 7 – 13)

OC Ukeje stars in the Opening Night film "Confusion Na Wa", by Kenneth Gyang.
OC Ukeje stars in the Opening Night film “Confusion Na Wa”, by Kenneth Gyang.

This year, Nigeria celebrates the centenary of its unification. To mark this special occasion, the 2014 NYAFF will highlight films that have been produced, inspired by, and made in Nollywood, Africa’s largest movie industry. We are proud to present our NYC audience with the winners of last year’s “African Oscars” (AMAA); Kenneth Niang’s frenetic dark comedy Confusion Na Wa and the poetical short Kwaku Ananse by Akosua Adoma Owusu, an adaptation of a mythological tale from Ghana about wisdom and belonging. We will also premiere Biyi Bandele’s highly anticipated film Half of a Yellow Sun, a rendition of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s best-selling book about the Biafran war, a movie that glows thanks to the leading performances of Thandie Newton, Anika Noni Rose and Oscar-nominee Chiwetel Ejiofor.

The animated film adaptation of the acclaimed comic series Aya of Yop City by Marguerite Abouet & Clement Oubrerie is not just an ode to young romance in West African cultures, but a nod to animation is at its golden age, encompassing every region of the world, including Africa. Victor Viyouh, Ninah’s Dowry carries in its poignant story of women empowerment the elements of a revolution. Cannes award-winner Mahamat-Saleh Haroun comes back to NYC with his latest movie Grigris, a story of love and solidarity between two outcasts in the backdrop of present-day Chad. Narratives of struggles and liberation from all around Africa and the diaspora round out the program, expanding the festival’s human scope: the incisive documentary Mugabe: Villain or Hero? by Roy Agyemang; Ibrahim El Batout’s feature Winter of Discontent, about the traumatic emotional and physical wounds of Egypt’s repressive system; and the Kenyan moral fable It’s Us (Ni Si Si), which stresses the need of forgiveness and comprehension of the other, complete the program.

Our shorts program is a fresh selection devoted to the richness and experimental elements of the genre and its special ability to convey this year’s festival theme. Young filmmakers use a wide range of approaches from sci-fi (Afronauts) to social melodrama (Aissa’s Story and Kuhani), with a special focus on comedy (Soko Sonko, Wooden Hands and Beleh) to reflect upon a wide spectrum of pressing contemporary issues.

To honor the 20th anniversary of South Africa’s independence, we will feature the controversial neo-noir Of Good Report by Jahmil XT Qubeka, which is exemplary of the vigor of South Africa’s present-day film industry. One of the most poignant epics of revolution and liberation ever filmed on the continent, Med Hondo’s masterpiece Sarraounia, winner of the first prize at FESPACO, will be the crowning jewel to close the festival.

MAYSLES CINEMA (MAY 15 – 18)

"Sodiq", a documentary by Adeyemi Michael
“Sodiq”, a documentary by Adeyemi Michael

We have put together this wide-ranging and penetrating program as an audiovisual allegory of the power and relentless effort of African people to overcome crisis and oppression. Built around the embodiment of the male figure as a vivid force to overcome crisis, we are delighted to introduce Rehad Desai’s striking new work Miners Shot Down to NYC audiences. Recent winner of the Camera Justitia Award at the Movies that Matter Festival, Desai’s documentary follows the developments that lead to the biggest use of force by security forces of post-colonial South Africa: the Marikana Massacre of a group of striking miners in August 2012.

The session devoted to the Cultural Healing Project Short Documentary Films gathers seven shorts reflecting on the challenges and opportunities faced by Sudan. This creative peace-building project sprouts from British-Sudanese filmmaker Taghreed Elsanhouri’s proposal that a group of auteurs film the story that mattered most to them in their communities, encouraging them to express through film their cultures and traditions.

Shorts and documentaries about men and women confronting personal, social, economic, and political limitations compose this compelling selection: the struggles of an addict in Zanzibar to defeat his dependence in the short Curse of an Addict; the desperation of a woman unable to conceive a male heir in chauvinistic present-day Nigeria in the feature film B for Boy by Chika Anadu; Eliaichi Kimaro’s quest to understand his complex identity as a young Tanzanian-Korean in the US in A Lot Like You; and the different hurdles standing between a young Congolese tenor and his dream (Rêve Kakudji); a child aspiring to be a doctor subjected to a trial for murder (Sodiq); and a heterogeneous group of people plunging into the uncertain future of Mali’s annual Festival in the Desert in The Last Song Before the War.

BAM Cinématek (MAY 23 – 26)

"Legends of Madagascar", by Haminiaina Ratovoarivony
“Legends of Madagascar”, by Haminiaina Ratovoarivony

Madagascar will be in the spotlight of the festival’s BAM run, with a carefully selected
group of movies that best represent the history of the country. Angano, Angano (1989) by the tandem César Paes & Marie Clémence, and When the Stars Meet the Sea (1996) by pioneer Raymond Rajaonarivelo will be screened alongside the recent road movie Legends of Madagascar (2012) by Haminiaina Ratovoarivony.

Beyond Madagascar, we will screen other films from across the continent. From Kenya we have Something Necessary, Judy Kibinge’s insightful reflection on the effects of the war in Kenya, as well as the tragicomedy Nairobi Half Life (2012) by David ‘Tosh’ Gitonga’. Based in Ivory Coast, Lonesome Solo’s Burn It Up Djassa (2012, Ivory Coast) blends together action and music in one of the most successful examples of contemporary African noir, and acclaimed Tunisian filmmaker Taieb Louhichi presents a touching story of love and longing in The Child of the Sun (2013).

Cassa, Cassa (2013), a revealing documentary about contemporary African dance by Elodie Lefebvre, and the fast-paced Fuelling Poverty (2012) by Ishaya Baku, which exposes gasoline fraud in Nigeria, show how documentary can serve as an X-ray of present-day realities in Africa.

Save The Date!

Mark your calendars! This year, the 21st New York African Film Festival opens at Walter Reade Theatre of Lincoln Center from May 7th to May 13th, 2014 before moving on to the Maysles Cinema Institute from May 15th to May 18th and completing its run at Brooklyn Academy of Music from May 23rd  to May 26th 2014.

Final SAVE THE DATE 1 Small

2014 NY African Film Festival | Venues

FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER
Walter Reade Theater, 165 West 65th St., between Broadway and Amsterdam Ave, Upper Level.
Tickets: General Admission $13, Students and Seniors (62+) $9, FSLC members, $8. Tickets for the Opening Night Reception and film on April 3 are $50.00. Information about tickets for the April 5 Festival Celebration Party are available upon request at 212-352-1720. For Walter Reade Theater tickets: call (212) 875-5601 or visit www.filmlinc.com or the Walter Reade Theater Box Office, Box Office Hours: Mon-Fri opens at 12:30pm, Sat/Sun opens one half hour before the first screening. Closes everyday 15 minutes after the start of the last show. Directions: 1 train to 66th Street. Bus: M5, M7, M10, M11, M66 and M104.


BAMcinématek @ BAM Rose Cinemas
30 Lafayette Avenue in Brooklyn.
Tickets: $12 per screening for adults; $9 for seniors 65 and over, children under twelve, and students 25 and under with valid I.D. Mon.-Thur., except holidays; $7 for BAM Cinema Club members.
Buy online: BAM.org/BAMcinematek, by phone at 718-777-FILM (theater ID #545) or at the BAM Rose box office. Tickets are also available through www.movietickets.com. Directions: take the C train to Lafayette; the N, R, D or M train to Pacific; the #2, #3, #5 train to Nevins; or the G train to Fulton.


MAYSLES CINEMA
343 Lenox Avenue, between 127th & 128th Streets.
Suggested donation: $10.
Buy online: mayslesInstitute.org/cinema. Program info at DocWatchers.com.
Directions: Take #2 or #3 train to 125th Street.


COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY
Teachers College, 525 West 120th Street (on 120th Street between Broadway and Amsterdam Ave.). Room TBA. No admission fee.
Directions: Take #1 train to 116th.  Columbia University, 606 West 122nd Street, New York, NY 10027 (between Broadway and Claremont). No admission fee.
Directions: Take #1 train to 116th or 125th Street.