Interviews

  • Interview with Jean-Marie Teno
  • Horst Rutsch
  • Born in 1954 in Famleng, Cameroon, Jean-Marie Teno studied communication at the University of Valenciennes.  Since graduating in 1984 with a degree in filmmaking, he has been living and working in France.  Directing both documentary and fiction, Teno frequently shoots his films himself, often in the reflexive and provocative style of the first-person narrative.  Rooted […]

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  • Ousmane Sembene’s London Season
  • Toyin Falola
  • Offerring its highest honour on Ousmane Sembene last month, the British Film Institute (bfi) said the 82-year-old is “the Patron Saint of Black Cinema – to call him a director is a misnomer.” Sembene became the 58th recipient of the bfi fellowship; past honourees include Orson Welles and Akira Kurosawa. Naming some with whom Sembene […]

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  • “Filmmaking can show the way”
  • Olivier Barlet
  • Interview with Souleymane Cissé Ten years have gone since Waati, your last big movie. What are your perspectives for filmmaking today in 2005? Filmmaking with a big F is taking a break, not because of the filmmakers, but because of those who are around them, around us. Those we are trying hard to understand. Are […]

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  • Camera Q&A: Deborah Perkin on Bastards and Morocco
  • Christian Niedan
  • Deborah Perkin is a British documentary filmmaker based in Wales, and a former-producer for the BBC. It was while working there that Perkin first pitched a story about Morocco’s family court system, and the unique charity that helps single mothers resolve their marriage status with their child’s father — thus helping those children to be […]

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  • Camera Q&A: Kenneth Gyang on Confusion Na Wa
  • Christian Niedan
  • Kenneth Gyang is a Nigerian filmmaker from the city of Jos, where he attended the National Film Institute. In 2012, he made his directorial debut with Blood and Henna, and followed it with 2013′s Confusion Na Wa — a title drawn from a line in a song by African musician Fela Kuti, and meaning “Confusion […]

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  • Interview with Branwen Okpako by Andrew Dosunmu
  • Andrew Dosunmu
  • A.D.: What do you want people to take out of your themes? And what experience do you want people to get? B.O.:  Okay, let me not be vain about it: I want people to leave Dirt for Dinner having learned something about the way German society functions and a little bit about the history of […]

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  • “Why shouldn’t everyone hear?”
  • Alonzo Rico Speight
  • …In your documentaries, you have this ability to extract truth from all these personalities and personages, that’s what’s so emblematic of your work. You’re getting these people to open up—how is that? Is it just because you come from a family of diplomats? Why is it that you can get to these people? House of […]

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  • “I, myself, will never finish learning.”
  • Mbye Cham
  • …I think that what I have done is that I have carried on this way of telling stories around the fire, with the soundtrack of the crackling fire and the crickets—this notion of how memory is transmitted from one generation to another in our culture. If you really knew my childhood, you would think that […]

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  • Not Nollywood: An Interview with Nigerian Filmmaker Tunde Kelani
  • Marissa Moorman
  • Tunde Kelani is a seasoned Nigerian filmmaker wrapping up his sixteenth film, Dazzling Mirage.On the film’s website Mainframe Movies, his production company founded in 1991, promotes this as a “movie and a movement.” This is not Nollywood. Observers, scholars, and critics usually describe Nollywood as everything but “cinema.” For some critics, it’s all absence except for its […]

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  • Interview with Jean-Marie Teno
  • Horst Rutsch
  • Born in 1954, in Famleng, Cameroon, Jean-Marie Teno studied communication at the University of Valenciennes.  Since graduating in 1984 with a degree in filmmaking, he has been living and working in France.  Directing both documentary and fiction, Teno frequently shoots his films himself, often in the reflexive and provocative style of the first-person narrative.  Rooted […]

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  • Still, The Fire in the Belly: The Confessions of Ousmane Sembene
  • Mamadou Niang
  • The meeting has been under way for well over two hours, and the seven participants do not seem exhausted after strings of passionate exchanges. The scene could have been ripped from a chapter of Ousmane Sembène’s fifth novel, God’s Bits of Wood, in which the women deliberate their plan of attack against the oppressive and […]

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  • The Trees of Specificity: Gaston Kaboré
  • Jude Akudinobi
  • Jude G. Akudinobi: How would you define African cinema? Gaston Kaboré: When I speak about African cinema, I am addressing the historical context of the birth of a cinema in Africa, the conditions in which filmmakers across the continent are trying to portray their realities, and how they are speaking about their histories and their […]

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  • Sembène the Ceddo*
  • Olivier Barlet
  • Young Ousmane was not predisposed to become the master of African cinema. His family, fishermen from Zinguidor, wasn’t wealthy or from a noble background. But when he was born in 1923, Casamance had just been “pacified”, after three centuries of active resistance. He grew up in a dominated world, then, but one that kept on […]

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  • Interview with Branwen Okpako
  • Andrew Dosunmu
  • AD: What do you want people to take out of your themes? And what experience do you want people to get? BO: Okay, let me not be vain about it. I want people to leave Dirt for Dinner having learned something about the way German society functions and a little bit about the history of […]

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  • "We are doing worse than Hollywood": Interview with Kwaw Ansah
  • Steve Ayorinde and Olivier Barlet
  • Steve Ayorinde: Thank you for the opportunity to speak with you. The name of Kwaw Ansah is to a large extent one of the most significant of African cinema. As far as cinema is concerned, we did not hear much from you in Nigeria since Heritage Africa. Has there been a break or change in […]

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  • Interview with Jean-Marie Teno
  • Horst Rutsch
  • Directing both documentary and fiction, Jean-Marie Teno frequently shoots his films himself, often in the reflexive and provocative style of the first person narrative. Born in 1954, in Famleng, Cameroon, Teno studied communication at the University of Valenciennes and graduated in 1984 with a degree in filmmaking. Rooted in post-colonial experience, Teno’s cinematic essays interrogate […]

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  • Universal Refugees: Interview with Cheick Fantamady Camara
  • Oliver Barlet
  • Shot in video, in the style of a news report, the film Be Kunko (the original working title was Little John) begins with the arrival of refugees in a UN camp. But very quickly, the camera becomes more fictional as it focuses on the life of a small clan, a brotherhood. The fact is that […]

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