Reviews

  • Notes from the 23rd New York African Film Festival
  • Françoise Bouffault
  • Each year, attending the African Film Festival feels like embarking on a journey across the heart of Africa. I am a comfortable traveler though, and from my seat at Lincoln Center, it is the eternal magic of the moving image that I submit to. I dream, I am amazed, I am angry, I am moved […]

    Read More…

  • Review of “Little John” Directed by Cheick Fantamady Camara
  • Olivier Barlet
  • Shot in video, in the style of a news report, the film begins with the arrival of refugees in a UN camp. But very quickly, the camera becomes more fictional as it focuses on the life of a small clan, a brotherhood. The fact is that if Little John has this news report value, its […]

    Read More…

  • MAX and MONA Review
  • Sean Jacobs
  •  Max and Mona is a post-apartheid South African comedy. Set in and around the country’s industrial capital Johannesburg, it revolves around young Max Bua (Mpho Lovingo), the village mourner of a small, provincial town who, despite inheriting his grandfather’s unique talent for making people cry at funerals, wants to pursue a medical degree in the […]

    Read More…

  • A Matter of Style
  • Patty Chang
  • Among the noteworthy films featured this year at the New York African Film Festival at Lincoln Center was George Amponsah and Cosima Spender’s documentary, The Importance of Being Elegant, which examines the Congolese subculture centered around the worship of clothes (kitende) known as la Société des ambianceurs et personnes élégantes (the Society of Revelers and […]

    Read More…

  • HELLO NIGERIA!
  • Zina Saro-Wiwa
  • Hello Nigeria! is actually the first in a series of programmes that I am doing where I attempt to dissect another culture through examining their celebrity magazines. The series is called Hello World!, but it was seeing the Nigerian society magazine Ovation that gave me the idea for the series in the first place. Launched […]

    Read More…

  • The Light at the End of the Dark Continent
  • Donald J. Levit
  • Man may work from sun to sun But woman’s work is never done.          -Traditional (origin unknown) Little gems from the Third World float westward once in a while, under- or non-promoted/distributed, for limited runs, or remora-like hitch a ride on bigger fish, like Irani Makhmalbaf’s and Burkinabè (i.e., native of Burkina Faso) Ouédraogo’s contributions […]

    Read More…

  • White Wedding Review
  • Akiedah Mohamed
  • The preview of White Wedding at Atlas studios in Johannesburg was packed yet people squeezed into any and every available space.  Within minutes of watching the film, I understood why there’s such a buzz ahead of its cinematic release; it’s an exceptionally funny comedy about two best friends traveling to Cape Town to get to […]

    Read More…

  • U-Carmen eKhayelitsha Review
  • Marion Manigo
  • When I first saw U-Carmen eKhayelitsha at the 13th New York African Film Festival in April 2006, I was mesmerized.  Because the film made such a strong social statement with its casting of Carmen, I was forced to examine my socialization of the standards of beauty.  As a result, my self-esteem has been raised and […]

    Read More…

  • Seventeenth edition of the New York African Film Festival
  • Joyce White
  • The seventeenth edition of the New York African Film Festival is almost over.  Opening on April 7 at the Walter Reade Theatre in Lincoln Center, the festival concludes at BAM Cinematek on Memorial Day weekend.  In between, organizers Richard Pena and Mahen Bonetti preside over a mix of films, q and a’s, receptions, panel discussions, […]

    Read More…

  • Soldiers of the Rock Review
  • Mejeke K. Maurice Jones
  • Norman Maake’s directorial debut is cinematic/karmic  kaleidoscope encompasses a boiling and poignant saga of the fraternity of determination and Shaka Zulu like strength that is the bedrock of a cadre of South African gold miners. Depending on the view on takes, these gallant men are centurions who ritualistic surgeons who daily descend into the bowels […]

    Read More…

  • KVTV Access: 2014 New York African Film Festival
  • KV Crew
  • Yes its true, KVTV Access is back! We invaded the 2014 New York African Film Festival and caught up with Kenyan directors Ekwa Msangi and Nick Reding, both of whom had films screening at the festival. We had a few drops from some very special guests, so check it out and drop us a note about […]

    Read More…

  • Video Awudjo! Featured Artist, Tunde Kelani, has New Developments after AFF
  • Kaine Agary
  • On Saturday, April 21, 2001, African Film Festival (AFFNY) took on the groundbreaking task of presenting movies from Nigeria and Ghana as part of its Festival schedule. This was the first time that an organized film institution recognized the mass-produced, consumer-driven aspect of Nigerian and Ghanaian movies.  In these countries, artists have adopted video to […]

    Read More…

  • We the Living
  • Donald Levit
  • South African theater, jazz, video and commercial film director Ian Gabriel’s first feature, Forgiveness, offers a sensitive probing of the realities of Apartheid and its human toll and legacy. One of twenty-four films from twelve countries at the multi-media twelfth annual New York African Film Festival shown by the Film Society of Lincoln Center, and a month […]

    Read More…

  • Sithengi’s fight for supremacy in Africa could cost it its identity
  • Ogova Ondego
  • Southern African International Film and Television Market, Sithengi, could lose its identity as it re-brands itself as Cape Town World Cinema Festival. Pundits argue that Sithengi is trying to do too many things at the same time and that its vision could get blurred—if not lost—in the clutter. It is good that South Africa has […]

    Read More…

  • 14th Annual African Film Festival
  • Ina Diane Archer
  • Celebrating its 14th year, the New York African Film Festival continues to exemplify the Film Society of Lincoln Center’s commitment to international cinema. Annually, programmer Mahen Bonetti expands perceptions of African people, culture and cinema, articulating the artistic commonalities of the continent while identifying regional distinctions.In this year’s festival, modernity versus tradition, African identity, immigration […]

    Read More…

  • AFRICAN FILM FEST STAGES A “CRUEL” QUICK HIT
  • JOYCE WHITE
  • The 17th New York African Film Festival got underway again last week with the premiere of a stunning 8-minute satire on revolution and oil seizure titled “Dr. Cruel,” a joint venture of film maker Teco Benson of Nigeria, and Jakob Boeskov of Denmark. “Dr. Cruel” unveils a Scandinavian terrorist, also played by Boeskov, and a group […]

    Read More…

  • It all began in Khouribga: the 15th Festival du Cinéma Africain de Khouribga
  • Sally Shafto
  • “An African film is a miracle, like the rain.” – Youssef Ait Hamou “’No wind is favorable to a sailor who does not know what port he is headed for.’” – Seneca, quoted by Nour-Eddine Saïl I first heard of Khouribga, located inland an hour south of Casablanca, while reading Fouad Laroui’s hilarious novel Méfiez-vous des […]

    Read More…

  • “Moi et Mon Blanc” Review
  • Mejeke K. Maurice Jones
  • This is a fast-paced comedy of errors cocaine caper; a humorous fast-paced, quick-witted tale of the collision and embrace of two cultures and the absurdity of caste, class and cash.  With aspiration and determination as the impulsive incentive, two parking lot attendants in France bumble across mega euro dollars and a large cache of cocaine. […]

    Read More…

  • Page 1 of 2
  • 1
  • 2
  • >